South Sudan is suffering from a water crisis. Although Sudan has suffered from water scarcity for decades, it’s descent back into war in 2013 after the country split has further exacerbated this.

The constant conflict within South Sudan has left the country’s water systems neglected or destroyed. The poor rains combined with the after-effects of the 2011 East African drought, and the decreasing value of South Sudan’s currency contrasted with the rising price of living (an increase of 30%), has depleted the countries’ clean water supply, and made it difficult, and expensive, for the population to access clean and safe water.

When clean water sources are scarce, it is left to the women and the girls to make the journey to find clean water – disrupting or halting the girls attendance at school, and preventing the women from working, which in turn places the families under further economic strain. For those in Juba City, who live too far from a clean water supply to walk, they must rely on water deliveries, which continue to increase the price of their water. Sometimes, these water distributors do not reach everywhere they are needed due to the rising cost of fuel. Some families that are struggling financially cannot afford to buy clean water, and so they have to either use dirty water, or go without.

97% of South Sudan’s water is used for agriculture, an industry that employees 80% of the population. Whilst only 2% of South Sudan’s water is for domestic use (in comparison: in the U.S. 13% of it’s water supply is for domestic use).